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in the united states, i have to be honest with you. i love the united states, i admire the united states. >> rose: and you're heavily invested here. >> yes, the united states is the leader of the world. it's going to be the leader of the world for many years to come. forget china's going to come out you're down. >> rose: that means? >> when you have a country has $14 trillion of cumulative debt and its g.d.p. around $14 million and both competing, that's not good. >> rose: debt or g.d.p.? >> yes. and when you have a budget deaf sit of a trillion dollars going for the foreseeable fueler, it's unacceptable. when you have economic vices that hit you badly and it was contagious, things are not we were there but you can get out of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bin talal for the hour next. ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. he's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him as one of the world's 25 most wealthiest people. "time" magazine
shows the global imbalance, which has more to do with fiscal policies in the united states, the household savings rates in the united states and the distortions in china, which inflates their savings rate artificially. that has to do with the international exchange. the international exchange is essentially a way for these economies to be adapting to the pressures and these distortions, which really have to do with the domestic policy. >> since the issue is so important and so treacherous, i would like to ask if the other panelists have any comments for this question. >> let me complain about this component, the most concerning aspect of this is in the financial sector. this is being promoted by many people in the official sector, who say that one way to make the system safer is to do this. this is, in a way, very understandable because of the problems that many of the smaller countries or dealing with. if we go down this route and we have protectionism with financial services, this will carry with it some bad implications. the least of which is that much of the growth in t
at a still unfolding economic disaster. the united states goes after al qaeda in yemen. we will talk about it on our roundtable tonight. and who says the news business is dead? in taiwan, they're drawing new viewers by animating it all. >>> from the different perspectives of reporters and analysts from around the world, this is "worldfocus." major support has been provided by rosalind p. walter and the peter g. peterson foundation, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening. welcome to "worldfocus." i'm daljit dhaliwal in new york. we begin tonight with the global economy and news of the key economic barometer, unemployment. in this country, the government said today it held steady at 10% last month as moyers cut 85,000 jobs which was more than expected. the news was disappointing in europe. in the 16 countries that used the euro as their currency, the jobless wrought was also 10%. in this case, for the month of november, up from 9.9% in octob
of the united states military is we grow and develop people. i mean i've had dozens of these interviews with people, okay, you're getting a few job. this is turning over a new leaf. this is a time to go get it. we've seen people turn their lives around. this is one of the great things about our institution. so clearly these are issues that the policymakers have to come to grips with. our task was put the spotlight on policies, weaknesses, gaps, that's what we have tried to do. i do believe there may be places where barriers should be retained in some way. >> and maybe for some. >> for some purpose. >> maybe promotions or -- >> exactly. >> whether it's a security issue. >> exactly. but what i'm suggesting is that people who are responsible for these policy decisions know what the vital dots look like. they know where they come from. as i -- the report said and in my earlier testimony, the time has passed for us to be having the turf wars on who owns the information. >> i couldn't agree with you more. this is a major challenge for all of us in the senate and house and committee and being
worry that the united states may sink into deflation and that was one consequence of the rate hitting zero bound. limiting the scope. those decisions in this period were faced with the risk of hitting zero-bound, policy makers should control the rates and being constrained by the lower bound on the policy interest rate. although these were warranted in policies in subsequent years, the question remains if the policy was necessary. since we cannot know how the economy would evolve under policies, the answer to this question is conjectual. one approach by this question is to compare policies during this period and the recommendations from the taylor rule, developed by john taylor of stanford university. this approach is subject to a number of indications. notably simple policy rules like the taylor rule are only rules of thumb and important people can disagree about the details of such rules. moreover simple rules may leave out factors that may be relevant such as the risk of the policy rate hitting zero-bound. which is why we don't make policy based on such rules alone. for these reaso
not demonstrated this capability. as the president of the united states noted in his state of the union address last night, the bank bailout was about as popular as a route canal. -- as a root canal. well, it appears that chairman bernanke will be reconfirmed, but i want to express with my vote that the leaders of president president obama's economic team must pivot from the necessary rescue of our major financial institutions to equally if not more necessary help to america's families. in prioritizing the recovery of wall street, leaders at the fed and the treasury, i believe, made significant errors in several key areas. failing to establish a due process mechanism to legally make adjustments to wall street pay, bonuses, and counterparty liabilities so they all had to be paid 100 cents on the dollar. hoarding the tarp reserve for banks long after banks were secure when families were desperate for help, but no, they clung to that reserve just in case the banks needed it. never mind the present need of american families. third, allowing the banks to prevent families in this chamber fighting aga
and united states are going to continue to cooperate so as to be more effective in preventing radical islamic terrorism and prosecuting it when it arises. we shared information with secretary napolitano. and in due course, people spoke and your contributed to that debate. we also came up with an joint statement. it's a eu-u.s. statement. it's an important resolution. it's based on aviation security in particular. and you'll get that text at the end of this press conference. we mention a number of points that are dear to us all. we're talking here about the risk of terrorists, basically the same risk on both sides of the -- i think we want to protect our principals and values. our way of life. and those attacks of course by terrorism. we also share -- say that we share responsibility for fighting terrorism to ensure safety and security for our citizens. i think we all share many of these international values. we talk about a number of objectives and measures. objectives have a lot to do with aviation security. if we've learned anything from the spoiled attack over detroit is that flighted stil
and the united states. in fact, many of the country's use proportional representation, public financing of campaigns. >> we might back up and explain proportional representation. it is not well understood in america at all. >> it is not. the quickest explanation is it produces multi-party democracy. >> some time to many parties like in italy -- not in ireland, that is proportional, but it actually has three. >> you can fine-tune your democracy by setting what you call a victory threshold. how many parties. in the unites the states with a system that is democrat or republican in many districts and most districts are so non- competitive we can tell you who will wind. >> in short hand, first past the post. >> winner-take-all. >> it has worked very well in the uk. periodically the labour party says it will go to proportional representation and then they realized they may lose some of the viability and backs off it. there are a lot of use of europe and america that it is old, that it is bureaucratic beyond belief, that it is overtaxed, that people don't work hard enough, that it is not compe
the united states and china's security relationship and encouraged by the joint statement that raumted from the president's recent visit to china. i welcome the administration's efforts to increase u.s. and china relations and cooperation in areas of common interests ranging from counterterrorism and nonproliferation to energy security. we must work together with china for the settlement of conflicts and reduction of retentions that contribute to global and regional instact including denuclearization of korean peninsula and the situation in south asia. i particular welcome the administration's support for increasing military to military contacts i've long viewed contacts is essential. it builds trust, promotes understanding, prevents conflicts and it fosters cooperation, and given my own visits to china in recent years i know how important these relationships are. looking back at u.s./china security cooperation under the previous administration, there are positive steps, but there's still much progress to be reeved. in the new administration will continue to face many challenges and i remai
income of the united states. what's the best gauge of the economy may well be what you'll see on the ground. in beijing, the financial crisis has been a story they've read in the papers. people worried earlier this year, there are a lot of signs that at least in this corner, things are okay. it builds confidence, especially when so many other countries are suffering from a recession. but the government says 8% is the minimum needed to keep this economy going. there's a belief that the most terrible times are over, which means the targets set for 2010 may well be even higher. melissa khan al jazeera, beijing. >>> a few other economic items tonight. the u.s. labor department indicated the number ofuv americans filing for unemployment benefits increased by an unexpected 36,000 last month to 482,000. in europe, lloyd's banking group said it will cut another 585 jobs next year, on top of the already 15,000 reported job cuts last year. general motors said today it will cut more than 8,300 more jobs across europe in its opal subsidiary. gm will close this opal factory u 2600 workers.
you have to speak to it? >> oh, sure, yes, i do. gularly. here in the united states, in europe and in the middle east. that assertion is based on the assumption that the united states cannot at the same time be totally committed to israel's security-- which we are-- and be totally committed to the creation of the palestinian state-- which we are. and i believe that those are not mutually exclusive. to the contrary, that i believe they are mutually reinforcing. it will help israel get security for its people if the palestinians have a state and this issue is over. >> rose: george mitchell for the hour. next. if you've had a coke in the last 20 years, ( screams ) you've had a hand in giving college scholarships... and support to thousands of our nation's... most promising students. ♪ ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george mitchell is here. he is president obama's special envoy to the middle east, the former maine senator and majority leader has a proven record of brokerin
barack obama, the u.s. president, that there will be further attacks on the united states unless he takes steps to resolve the palestinian situation. in an audiotape obtained by al- jazeera on sunday, the al qaeda chief, praised the nigerian accused of the christmas day bombing." we would give a listen to a translation of that tape. -- we will get a listen to a translation of that tape. >> made peace beyond those that osama bin laden brings guidance to. our message, carried by words, conveyed to you through the flame of the hero, we have proved that the heroes of 9/11 can be effective. the message is that america will never dream of living in peace unless we lived it in palestine. it is not fear -- it is not fair that you enjoy a safe life while our brothers in gaza suffered greatly. with god's will, we will continue as long as you continue to support israel. peace be on those that follow the lead of guidance. host: that tape was released yesterday. first, a quick political note, marion barry is set to announce his retirement after seven terms, according to two sources. the move would mak
barrier, for these issues. in the united states we have the high-paying jobs here in the united states. host: how can this be done? caller: i am not certain about how you can do this. it seems that corporate america would rather pay the lower costs, then keeping the labor here in the united states. the government may be able to find a way to keep these jobs here in the united states. host: thank you very much. the "richmond times dispatch." they have a report on the comeback of the stock market, and how the seemed unimaginable. that is one take on the economy. baltimore, you are up right now. how are you doing? caller: i would say the number one policy issue for me is afghanistan. and there is the economy and jobs. i have done quite a bit of reading. this is reminding me of vietnam. i think that this is taking so many resources from the country and it will be hard to address any other problem. we are approaching this in the middle east, and this is not helping to solve the problems over there. more money should be devoted to domestic problems. i would like to see a lot done with public
restored the united states prestige for damaged it with apologies? listen. >> i will restore our moral standing so that america is, once again, that last best hope for all who are called to the cause of freedom. >> president obama embarks on his first european swing, a trip largely focusing on the languishing global economy. >> if you look at the sources of this crisis, the united states certainly has some accounting to do with respect to a regulatory system that was inadequate because of massive changes that have taken place in the global financial system. >> after already apologizing for setting the global recession at least partially in motion the president also apologized for america looking down on europe. >> in america, there is a failure to appreciate europe's leading role in the world. instead of celebrating your dynamic union and seeking to partner with you to meet common challenges, this have been times where america has shown arrogance and been dismissive, even derisive. >> can i ask you whether you sub vibe as many of your predecessors have to the school of american except
of drugs, the purchasing of drugs in the united states and western europe. until we deal with the current until we deal with the current -- the issue of consumption, we h supply. many believe that mexico is fighting the u.s. problem. drugs are still reaching the u.s. market. guest: if we don't participate, it creates a griddle next national security issue? guest: we need to participate but there are many things united states could do like to deal with the flow of arms out of most mexicans are being killed by weapons exporter from the united states. where is all the money going? why can we open a bank accounts and find out where the money from this terrible curse is actually going? host: is it your view that drug consumption has bite in the last few years? guest: very much so. we have a much wider variety of stuff that people can buy, unfortunately. host: first up is syracuse on and democrats . caller: 01 to ask about haiti and the bill clinton policy and that record -- i wanted to ask about haiti and the bill clinton policy in that regard. there's an issue about the phone company privatiz
-election to the united states senate. on each of these occasions, i have begun my remarks by observing that every important journey in life begins and ends at home. today is no exception. what is different about today, however, is not to announce the beginning of yet another campaign for the united states senate, but rather to announce that after 35 years of representing the people of connecticut and the united states congress, i will not be a candidate for re-election this november. i want to begin these very brief remarks by expressing my deepest gratitude to the wonderful people of connecticut for the remarkable privilege of being elected eight times over the past four decades to our national assembly. you have honored me beyond words with your confidence. let me quickly add that there have been times when my positions and actions have caused some of you to question that confidence. i regret that. but it is equally important that you know that i have never wavered in my determination to do the best job for our state and our nation. i love my job as your senator. i always have, still do. howeve
president obama restored the united states prestige or damaged it with apologies? listen. (cheers) >> i will restore our moral standing so america is once again that last best hope for all who are called to the cause of freedom. >> president obama em barks on the first european swing focused on the languishing glowing economy. >> if you look at the source of this crisis the united states certainly has some accounting to do with respect to a regulatory system that was inadequate, the massive changes that have taken place in the global financial system. >> after already apoll guysing for sending the global recession partially in motion the president also apologized for america looking down on europe. >> in america there's a failure to appreciate europe's leading role in the world. instead of celebrating your dynamic union and seeking to partner with you to meet common challenges there have been times where america has shown arrogance and been dismissive, even derissive. >> can i ask you whether you prescribe as many of the predecessors have to the school of american exceptionalism that se
started talking about a stimulus package in the united states that was coupled -- and i stress this point -- that was coupled with an indication of how we are going to deal with the united states' medium term budget problems. we will see the largest buildup in peacetime public debt. how we deal with that is critical. i was talking about an "l" shaped recovery, i was not really focusing on the downside risks that i see. i would say some of them have been mentioned and have a very good chance of materializing in 200010. -- in 2010. the middle of 2010 is the short term. the long term is beyond 2010. the full risks that i would indicate -- the four risks that i would indicate, and i would put them in the order of the way i worry about them. the first is the situation in europe. philip correctly mentioned parallels with the convertibility plan. these countries really have to be dealing with budget deficits that are in double digits in the middle of a recession without having an exchange rate mechanism or independent monetary policy to deal with it. that is a risk. that is a train wreck waiting
and reconstruction of how we deliver primary secondary education in the united states. and that's exactly what this panel is going to be discussing. very interesting papers on exactly that point by john chubb and steve wilson. and two inspired discussants. and without further ado, let me just say the presenters have 12 minutes each, the discussants 10 minutes each and if everybody is brisk we will have time for some conversation and discussion. take it away, john chubb. >> good morning. this morning and in the first panel you heard about mostly operational savings. now we're going to switch to the topic of educational opportunities. the country for the last two years has been going through the worst recession since the great depression. and every industry has been under enormous, enormous pressure to change. education is not unique in that regard. i want to start with an example. to illustrate this. the state of hawaii, like many other -- every other state in the nation has been under enormous pressure to try to deal with its budget gaps. it came to the decision last summer that it would balan
other nation in the united states. there are more is really nasdaq companies than japanese, than canadian and british and german than anything. it's extraordinary. capitalism hasn't been shown to fail. capitalism has been shown to work and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self pity this of course encouraged by the victimhood. one of the things on my radio show is the michael medved show where we are proud to say every day i am not a victim the idea of american victimhood suggests our standard of living and difficulties in our choices it's much lower. we can't live the kind of lives our parents live and it's getting worse and everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. robert wright. heritage in this building has some terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states the progress under the capitalist america particularly since 1980 has been dazzling, unprecedented. the options available to people, the extended life expectancy and for college we are now at a st
.org. >>> in yemen where the plot was planned, the united states has reopened its embassy after it was closed for two days because of security concerns. u.s. officials say successful counter terrorism operations by yemen had allowed them to resume operations. however, yemen's interior ministry issued its own statement, saying that the security situation in the capital had always been under control. and yemeni security officials say the government has sent thousands of troops to take part in a campaign against al qaeda in three provinces in recent days. as we have seen, the united states has been emphasizing an increasingly cooperative relationship with yemen in the last few days. underscored by comments over the weekend by president obama and a visit to yemen by general david petraeus. the commander of u.s. forces in the region. however, the "washington post" reports today that senior yemeni officials are playing down the partnership, fearing that the government could pay a heavy political price for aligning itself with the united states and appearing too weak to control al qaeda by itself. the artic
virginia. it is a huge room filled with computers. it is basically the brain of the united states intelligence system. any tip -- it was created after september 11. this was the place that was supposed to answer the 9/11 commission report on the failure to connect the dots. this is the place. this is one of its first big tests. this is a place in northern virginia were all the data comes in. there's not a single agency that is supposed to run the show entirely. it's under the office of the director of national intelligence. it is under the director. it is not any single persons jurisdiction. all the different agencies are supposed to be participating. they are all supposed to share the data and make sure they do not miss things. in design, it is supposed to do exactly what it should have done here. it did not. why? i do not know the answer. caller: good morning. in the regulatory world, there's a thing called root cause analysis when a problem occurs. you look to find out what the true systemic cause of the problem was. when i look at what i know, this was not a system failure. th
were to require the united states or any country really to clean up after its military activity overseas, there really would be no end to what can be required of them. of them. the u.s. recently paid 100 million -- about ten years ago paid not $100 million to canada to clean up to relatively minor facilities that we had up in the northern part of that country, and that is an instance where the impacts and amount of damages were ultimately minor and we don't want to get into a situation where we are having to -- we i mean the u.s. military, not obviously myself -- where the military is having to check itself and spend an inordinate amount of time keeping its activities limited or somehow above board environment and therefore possibly do that, possibly not doing as much as it can to fulfill its mission. that is its perspective and the perspective of people in the government i spoke with for the article. now, all of that being said -- and you have these two categories around which there is no corpus of international law we had no motivation normal momentum toward the development of
that a nigerian was being prepared for attacks in the united states on the homeland. my understanding is the least one of those intersects i think there were several specifically mentioned umar farouk abdulmutallab, the first two names. if you put it together with the fact this suspect's own father and not just anyone off the street as it has been stated by some in the intelligence community but a respected nigerian banker went physically to the embassy and talked to not one agency but to, the department and central intelligence agency and wasn't in missing person report. he said he was conservative his son, he's in yemen, and the nsa intercepted background. follow those meetings with written communications and telephone calls. we know that yemen is a hotbed of terrorism. apparently intelligence community didn't receive a possibility al qaeda and the arab peninsula might attack the homeland which is the story is another failure of imagination and it seems al qaeda is fixation on aviation system all of it seems to me not just in retrospect but before the effect of to have been enough to put on high
to establish a good relationship with the president of the united states because the united states is so a important to our vital interests, economic, security interests. they are our best ally and closest neighbor. they are our very best friend in the world as well and we should not forget that. we have established a good relationship. we have been working to align our approach is on a number of economic and environmental issues. i enjoy working with president obama. i do not envy him. his challengers are much greater than mine. they have so many more global responsibilities dain canada but the problems with the economy, health care, you name it, there frankly so much more. i do not envy his position. as i have said to my american friends, we are here to try and be helpful while protecting our own interests. >> you were recently in china. let's get your perception of the premier who seemed to give you a dressing down for taking so long to come. they are in very powerful players. when was your perception? >> we attend international summits quite regularly and i have had a chance to have
of the united states and everybody should come here to see it. and i'm delighted to be back here again. now this book, which is a big fat book can be used as a doorstop if you decide not to read it. it will work that way. the title of the book comes in the statement of jefferson. he referred to the united states, jefferson being the most expansive mind and president in history. he referred to the united states and he was president as an empire of liberty, a different kind of empire is what he saw. indeed, as i said, had great visions for the growth of this united states. i've introduced this book with a little brief description of rip van winkle's -- washington irving story, rip van winkle, which i think captures some of the extraordinary changes that took place in this. in 1789 and 1815. in fact, from the revolution to the second decade of the 19th century. irving, who was conservative and conservative sensibilities, wrote the short story which i think is his most famous short story, most of you are familiar with it. in the second decade of the 19th century. i think he was trying to expres
clinton, the president of the united states from 1993 to 2001, and i will never forget, on the education of our 30th -- 30th anniversary, the very difficult situation where you joined us and where you made such a great speech. since that time, you have been with us, i think, every single year. and we are so glad to welcome you back, and particularly at this very special occasion. [applause] i think what people appreciate most is your sense of passion and the deep sense of humanity which you show always as an individual. it is not so much your formal work as a president which impresses everybody, but it is in addition -- you as a human being, which is such a great characteristic of yours. bill, you have a relationship with the country that dates back several decades. even you had your honeymoon in haiti. and since that time, i know that you had to spend a lot of your attention, of your time in your presidency but also after words with the clinton initiative in giving special attention to haiti. your knowledge of the country, its people, and its challenges has also been the reason why in m
, and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self-pity that is encouraged by the victim. one of the things in my ratio is it's the michael medved show where we're proud to say everyday i am not a victim, the idea of american victimhood suggest that our standard of living and our difficulties and our choices, it's all much lower, we can't live the kind of lives that our parents live and it's getting worse. everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. now, robert rector rodger at heritage writer in the building has done terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states, the progress under capless american, particularly since 1980, has been dazzling, has been unprecedented. the options that are available to people, the extended life expectancy, college, we're now at at a stage where the majority of american young people in every ethnic group, are pursuing some form of post high school graduation after they graduate from high school. this is phenomenal. sometimes that education m
relations with the united states in 1995. hen knoy's overwhelming goal was to win favorable trade deals with the united states and admission to globaled bodies like the world trade organization, bringing up unpleasant subjects like agent orange, worked against that strategy. but having detained these schools, hanoi has begun to press its demands and is demanding compensation for the suffering of its people and that has put the united states in a tough spot. not wanting to set a precedent but on the other hand recognizing vietnam is an increasingly vital military security allies and trading partner. it also raises a larger issue of what responsibility to the u.s. military has to clean up the environmental messes after the war a run. meanwhile another hidden problem with agent orange is impacting our veterans. with each passing year medical researchers are discovering many illnesses many of them major chronic diseases like parkinson's for which exposure to the agent orange turns out to be a risk factor. hundreds of thousands have been denied va care for years and is said they avoided for
the united states and japan, between the foreign minister and secretary clinton. they're really starting to cement their relationship. i can sense the chemistry and the trust developing between the two. that's deeply gratifying. in addition, the secretary gave a speech really outlining -- to interact with asia when it comes to its fledgling international organizations. and so even though the trip was abriefiated, i think we got quite a bit of work done. as p.g.a. indicated, this is today we're marking the 50th anniversary of the u.s.-japan security alliance, the security partnership. it's no exaggeration to say that it has been the cornerstone and the foundation of everything that we've managed to accomplish over the course of the last few generations inin asia. and we hear this not just from japanese friends but throughout the region. over the course of the last couple of months, as the united states and japan worked together on a series of challenging matters, one of the things that's been most interesting and gratifying is how much we hear from other countries in the region, from sout
students from all over the united states. i've been associated with this program as faculty director for about 10 years. and this is a program which is very dear to my heart. and we have consistently had some of the best, most authoritative speakers available. and cerda, this is true of juan zarate. there is a scene in the 1975 movie about the watergate invasion, all the presidents men. and there's a meeting in an underground washington garage and watch how holbrook, playing an informant known by the name of deep throat, tells robert redford playing bob warburg, the "washington post" reporter, that if he wants to find out who is responsible for the water great burglary, at democratic party headquarters, at the watergate, you should follow the money. well, we have some here today who has followed money. in his capacity as deputy assistant secretary of the treasury. and this was a job that really involves one of the most complex tasks in the antiterrorism effort. that have these people get their money, how they spend their money, and it takes a person with uncommon diligence and uncomm
to be a sustained policy after the first action, does the united states then support future actions or does it say never again, that this cannot occur again? all the while dealing with the aftermath of then is really strike and the implications that entail. finally, if this does not come to pass, and iran, diplomacy does not work in israel does not strike then we are going to be focusing a large part of the coming year and afterwards on confidence-building and reassurance among our allies as we try to build a containment regime to deal with nuclear iran. i would raise the question one of the main challenges we will face in confidence building is how to convince the allies that a country that was unable to prevent iran from achieving the outcome we defined as unacceptable, that is acquiring nuclear weapons, will also be able to have the willpower and resolve to deter nuclear iran and we will face challenges in our theater engagement strategy and trying to build a containment architecture to do with nuclear iran if that comes to pass. just a couple of quick comments about the whole issue of strategi
. the murder rate in the united states in 1991 was -- there were 24,000 murders. the population is roughly two of its 60 million. last year in afghanistan, 2000 afghans died in the violence but the population of afghanistan was roughly 30 million. do the math. . . why did the afghans -- what is your view of the future? when americans ask this question, i am surprised only 17% said that. if u.s. afghans the same question, 40% had the view. but as a surprising answer, given that we're the most corrupt country in the world, but the reason afghans have this answer is because this looks like what we have lived through. each one of these would be devastating to a country, so even though we know all the problems, what is going on is better than the last -- then the past. almost none of the refugees have returned. refugees did not return to a place they do not think they have a future, and afghans do not think they have a future. many people, including girls, when asked if they have more freedom, 75% said yes. let's say we solve afghanistan given what i have said, there is still a problem with pakista
obama will have been leading the united states for exactly one year. the year was filled with challenges, afghanistan, iraq, the economy, health care. how did he meet those challenges? we spoke back in november with an extraordinary panel of eminent historians. peggy noonan, robert carol, nell irving painter. a terrific conversation. i thought it was important to bring it to you again now as we look back at the president's first year. also on the show, a battle you may never have heard of. you will want to learn all about it. many say it encapsulated many of the problems that america faces in the war at large. the best military report, military expert in the country, tom bricks, joins me to tell you about it. while much of the focus of the nation and the show is on the hotspots around the world, what about the rest of the world? we will talk with the famous international writer and scholar of singapore to get a very different perspective on the world. let's get started. >>> all day long on cable, news talk shows, we hear about how president obama's doing. on fox, some say he's a socialis
, the united states's perspective on relations with the muslim world and where do we go from here with the muslim world? for much of the past decade since the events of 9/11 we talked a lot about the muslim world. in our media it has become part of the language of our politics. it matters a lot to us. thinking often is the united states or the muslim world are not on the right path -- not on the same page. we fought a lot about how to fix that relationship and particularly think about writing those things that are not going right. that context, that worries us more than the question of extremism. the perception that the muslim world thinks too much about conservative ideas and too permissive towards extremism and this is something that will be addressed for policy consent. much of that is quite true. extremism is an issue of paramount concern. it is a foreign policy consideration. it is the major focus of u.s. foreign policy and to that extent it is also the way in which many americans view the muslim world. but there's also a tendency that it becomes too all consuming. it becomes
back to them, plus interest. and one caller stated earlier, the banking system of the united states should be a national or federalized system where the people, through government, issues credit to whoever needs it. that way the money stays within the system instead of going through the pockets of private bankers. so it's really a moot point whether he should be replaced or not. it's who's going run the mafia. it doesn't matter. it's still the mafia that's sucking the wealth out of our nation. host: off twitter, someone who identifies himself as c.p., says bernanke is just being scapegoated for congress' mistakes, washington politics as usual, all form and no substance. largo, florida, independent line. frank, go ahead. caller: good morning. i'll have to second the previous caller's assertions there. hl-1207 has 300 sponsors in the house, and s-604, bills to audit the fed, has over 30 cosponsors in the senate. and we need to call our senators to get this audit of the federal reserve. after that, it will be very easy to establish a grand jury, which will have subpoena power and indic
-- the world's leading communication nation, the united states, has been at least until recently outcommunicated by mass murdered living in the most remote areas of afghanistan and pakistan. and we have to take the public information space back from the enemy in order to succeed. and ashley is pioneered such creative ideas as using cell phone technology and such obviously ideas as countering their abuse of low wattage fm station to say terrible lies. next to her, is valley nee 15. he came to us from and has just written another one of the wonderful books. he was working on pakistan for us and not on iran, since that always appeared in the blogs inaccurately. i think we are missing someone. tim who came to us from afghanistan. a representing the future of the foreign service. we have a whole lot of other people in the back there, including in the department, from nine other agent sis plus the state department. strobe, what i'd like to say, the most common question i get in when i walk down the street or run into people is the most valid. why are we in afghanistan? that's a fair qu
places on the face of the planet. but this bill is about priorities on the united states of america. we are $12 trillion in debt. we're spending $600 million a day just in interest on that debt. this congress momentarilyly is going to have to raise -- moltary is going to have to raise the debt ceiling another $1 trillion. we don't have the money to do this. currently the national park service has an estimated $9 billion in backlog. $9 billion that they need to help with the national parks to preserve and to upgrade what we already have in our current holding. what the president will probably say in less than eight hours, create this air of oh, we have to be a little fiscally responsible. we ought to freeze a few things. for the second time in just over a week here we are going to come and look at this bill to acquire at the cost of $40 million to $50 million property with funds that we don't have. no longer can this government continue to use the government credit card -- decide to vote in favorite of this bill although it's just an authorization, although it's not an appropriation, are
more about europe economic difficulti and what they mean for the united states. for that we're joid by one of our regulars. he is from bloomberg busines being. thank you for cing on the program. howould youompare the state of economi recovery in europe veus the utah? > it is not gat for noun. no oneoute now on eitheruds of the pond are in a position to brag. senioriti it is a common language in europe, even with the euro zone yohave a situation marked by e haves and t haves much, much, much, much, hess. it isar more polarized than would you see in michigan. >> breakt town for us more close. how are theountries in eure that matter the most, germany, france, italy and spain, how are they oing? >> we have seen older urm, as some put it, germany, france, somether maurz inestern europe, hold their own. the economies weren't growi that rap you hly that far to beginwith. with the exception of britain, of course. on the flip de of that you have the jump stts. the resurgerients such as spain and lata that reay felt their ecomic growth. and theyaw this newaradigm thinking and they went o and
the united states to have at least one corridor of substantial length that's served by a japanese or a european-style high-speed railroad? >> i think it's important that first off we wait and see what is applied for. you know, obviously i can't start commenting on what we're going to do until applications come forward and are weighed, you know, graded and then approved but clearly again i think we understand the need to ensure that we have very tangible, very, you know, substantial successes. and, you know, clearly again our vision is to follow the model of what the europeans have advanced. you know, keep in mind, when when the system in spain first opened up, you know, again ms. fleming talked about how essentially they begin with one trunk line, they did. they began with their one trunk line. essentially it was six to eight trains a day run being 125 miles an hour and from that they were so successful that they incrementally made the improvements that got them to roughly 20 trains a day at speeds of 200 miles an hour. so this is going to take a buildout, you know, a buildout muc
-span is a person under the law of the united states and constitutional holding. here is why -- if the fcc and fbi were to blow through these doors right now and turn off all the cameras and a subpoena your files, it would be c-span -- it cannot vote, it is not a citizen, and yet everyone would recognize that that is a fundamental violation of the rights of c-span. why? because at the end of the day, c-span, just like any other association of individuals, it is an association of the people that make up the entity. this is very important. we cannot skip past the idea that associations of individuals have their rights and keep it short shrift. have to be respected in a democratic republic. with regard to george sorus, campaign finance law requires them to spend independently all he wants, but the sec investigated import i believe two years for a book -- the fcc investigated him out for i believe two years for a book he wrote about george bush. if we are deciding if a book should be banned or if books are illegal or if books are not part of our debate, whether by george soros or any other individual,
about the situation in uganda. will you please talk to us a little bit more about how the united states can protect the rights of lgbt people in those areas where their rights are not respected? >> yes. first, let me say that, over this past year, we have elevated into our human rights dialogue and a public statements a very clear message about protecting the rights of the lgbt community worldwide. we are particularly concerned about some of the specific cases that have come to our attention around the world. there have been no organized efforts to kill and maim gays and lesbians in some countries that we have spoken out about and also conveyed are very strong concerns about to their governments, not that they were governmentally implemented or even that the government was aware of them, but that the government's need to pay much greater attention to the kinds of abuses we have seen in iraq, for example. we're deeply concerned about some of the stories coming out of iran. in large measure and reaction, we think, in response to the elections back in june, there have been abuses committed
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